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Malaysian Grand Prix

For over two decades, we’ve had the Malaysian Grand Prix. It has been one of the toughest in the MotoGP calendar. We continue to see how the Grand Prix has pushed toward a more exciting event than a challenging one over the years. The Malaysian Grand Prix is one event we look forward to every year. 

Except for 2020 and 2021, when the event was scrapped because of the global pandemic that saw the world lockdown for months, the Malaysian Grand Prix has been on the MotoGP calendar since the first race. With the event back in 2022, we’re looking forward to many more races and exciting moments. 

Malaysian Grand Prix History

The first Malaysian Grand Prix race happened in 1991 at the Shah Alam Circuit, and it was the final race of the MotoGP season. However, because of some reason, many riders didn’t participate in the MotoGP race. So, the first 500cc/MotoGP class was won by John Kociniski with Yamaha. 

The event is known for its incredible harsh weather and tropical temperatures, and from 1992 to 95, the riders suffered this crazy harsh clime. But in 1998, the MotoGP race was moved to the Johor Circuit, and this was because of the 1997 financial crisis in Asia, which hit Malaysia as well. And as a result, the local government couldn’t host the race. 

However, the Malaysian Grand Prix race was only held at the Johor Circuit for one year before it was permanently moved to the Sepand International Circuit in 1999. In 2006, the race was scheduled to go on as usual, but because of heavy rainfall, the qualifying practice race in the MotoGP class was canceled. 

In 2011 as the race was scheduled to go on, as usual, the MotoGP race was canceled after a crash happened in the second lap, resulting in the death of Marco Simoncelli. And since only one lap was completed, the Malaysian Grand Prix race was abandoned for the MotoGP season, only to resume the following year. 

How to Bet on the Malaysian Grand Prix Race

If you’re looking for ways to bet on the Malaysian Grand Prix, do not worry, the process isn’t too tricky. You can kickstart your betting journey when you find the right sports betting platform and can understand the steps it takes to become a MotoGP bettor. You just have to find the right platform to get started.

The first thing is to find the right sports betting platform that works for you. You can do this by looking at the different sports betting sites available. You should take the time to check out review sites with recommended sportsbooks to join. Pick one from their list and begin the process to start betting on the Malaysian Grand Prix races. 

Once you find a suitable sports betting site to join, you need to create an account. You can do this by following the different steps of the online sports betting site. It would help if you took the time to find the registration page and ensure you followed the steps thoroughly without missing any parts. 

Finally, after you’re done with your registration, you should take the time to go deposit money into your bet account. This process doesn’t take time, and if you’re lucky, you’ll find suitable payment options to use within minutes; you’ll be done with the depositing process, and your account will be credited. 

Once that is done, you can go to the MotoGP page in the sportsbook section to start placing bets on your Malaysian Grand Prix predictions.  

Sepang International Circuit Fun Facts

After starting its story at the Shah Alam Circuit from 1991 to 1997, the Malaysian Grand Prix moved its business to the Johor Circuit, no thanks to the Asian Financial Crisis. But after one year in Johor, the Sepang International Circuit was already completed making it easy for the government to move it to a circuit closer to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport.

Since 1999, Sepang has been the home of the Malaysian Motorcycle Grand Prix, and we look forward to more years. In that case, let’s look at some fun facts about the Sepand international circuit. 

  • The Sepang International Circuit broke ground in 1997 but was officially opened in 1999.
  • The leading architect for the project was Hermann Tilke.
  • The capacity of the circuit is 130,000, and the FIA grade is 1.
  • The length of the primary circuit is 3.445 miles, with 15 turns.
  • The Sepang International Circuit was officially inaugurated by the fourth prime minister of Malaysia, Mahathir Mohamad.

Top Five Major Malaysian Grand Prix Crashes

Every MotoGP race has had its fair share of crashes, and the Malaysian Grand Prix is no different. The event suffered serious incidents that even resulted in the race’s cancellation. So, we want to examine some of the significant crashes at the Malaysian Grand Prix. 

  • Marco Simoncelli 2011
  • Marc Marquez 2016
  • Kurtis Roberts 2001
  • Dani Pedrosa 2008
  • Valentino Rossi 2018

Top Malaysian Grand Prix Facts

The Malaysian Grand Prix is working toward becoming one of the best races in the MotoGP calendar. It has an exciting history. So, as we move towards another season, let’s look at some top facts about the Malaysian Grand Prix. Let’s get into them without wasting time. 

  • The Malaysian Grand Prix was the last race in the MotoGP calendar for the 1991 season.
  • The event was abandoned in 2011 following Marco Simoncelli’s death.
  • The Malaysian Grand Prix has had different sponsors, including Malboro, Gauloises, Shell, and Petronas.
  • John Kocinski won the first Malaysian Grand Prix race with Yamaha in 1991.
  • Honda is the most successful constructor in the Malaysian Grand Prix event.

Malaysian Grand Prix FAQs

The Malaysian Grand Prix has been held on three different circuits since the first race in 1991.

Valentino Rossi holds the record for the most wins at the Malaysian Grand Prix.

Yes, you can learn more about this MotoGP race when you visit the MotoGP official website.

If you want to win bets on the Malaysian Grand Prix race, you need to take the time to research the participants before you predict.

Unfortunately, there has been one death at the Malaysian Grand Prix. It happened in 2011 when Marco Simoncelli crashed during the second lap, resulting in the race being abandoned.

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